Weather forecasts Tides Visitor's guide
picto-sonnerie-belugas

A ringtone to demonstrate your love of the beluga whale!

To celebrate Earth Day, the SaguenaySt. Lawrence Marine Park is launching the “beluga” ringtone. The St. Lawrence beluga is an endangered species whose population is estimated at 889 individuals. During the summer, the beluga whale frequents the Saguenay–St. Lawrence Marine Park to feed, socialize, and rest. The protected area also includes several locations where females give birth to and care for their young.

Nicknamed the “sea canary”, the beluga whale emits a great variety of sounds such as whistling, grunting and barking in order to communicate, orient itself and hunt. The beluga has a well-developed hearing, because it cannot use its sight in the darkness of the marine depths. For the newborn, communication with the mother is mainly through sound. Hearing takes an important place in the realisation of the beluga vital activities. Thus, it is essential to protect their sound environment for the recovery of this population.

Below you will find four sound clips recorded at various locations in the Marine Park. This is only an overview of the diversity of communication of this species! Some of these sounds are associated with communication (whistling) or location (clicks).

The Marine Park wants to raise awareness of the importance of sound communication for this endangered species. Demonstrate your commitment to its protection by adopting the “beluga” ringtone on your mobile device.

To learn more about the St. Lawrence beluga, the measures taken for its protection and the natural and cultural riches of the Marine Park, see the sections protect and get to know.

Ringtone 1

In this recorded excerpt from the Pointe-Noire sector can be heard whistling, pulsed tones and knocking. There is a “cathedral effect” due to the echo caused by the reflection of the sounds from the seabed in the Saguenay Fjord.

Download ringtone!

Ringtone 2

In this excerpt, recorded while 10 to 15 beluga adults and juveniles were in Baie Sainte-Marguerite, a succession of whistles, pulsed tones and clapping sounds can be heard. 

Download ringtone!

Ringtone 3

In this excerpt, recorded in the Saguenay Fjord between the mouth and baie Sainte-Marguerite, a pod of adult and juvenile whales going up the Fjord to Baie Sainte-Marguerite can be heard. Pulsed tones and a few whistles can be heard.

Download ringtone!

Ringtone 4

In this excerpt, recorded in the Saguenay Fjord between the mouth and baie Sainte-Marguerite, a pod of adult and juvenile whales going up the Fjord to Baie Sainte-Marguerite can be heard. A pulsed tone and whistling can be heard at the same time.

Download ringtone!

These ringtones were produced from recordings made by Yvan Simard, an expert in marine acoustics applied to the ecosystem and marine mammals. 

Instructions to download ringtones

iPhone:

1) Download the sounds (.m4r file) on your computer by using a browser other than Safari and Internet Explorer;

2) Add the .m4r files in your iTunes sound library;

3) Synchronize your iPhone by clicking on the sounds you want to import on your mobile phone.

Note: It is impossible to download the .m4r file directly from your iPhone or iPad. You must follow the procedure above.

Android/Blackberry: You can download the sounds (.mp3 files) directly from your mobile device and select one of them as your ringtone.