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PROTECT

The Marine Park protects every living organism found in it, from the seabed to the surface of the water. Species at risk like the St. Lawrence population of beluga whales and the blue whale roam its waters. See how the park protects its biodiversity.

SPECIES AT RISK

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BARROW’S GOLDENEYE

During the fall and winter, nearly one third of the Barrow’s Goldeneye population inhabiting Eastern North America come to spend time in the shallow rocky bays of the St. Lawrence Estuary.

If a catastrophe should occur, such as an oil spill, the gregarious behaviour of these ducks would be disastrous to their survival. Forestry operations also threaten the Barrow’s Goldeneye’s breeding grounds, as they nest in trees.

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Atlantic cod

Over the past 30 years, the Atlantic Cod population has suffered a 90% decline. Fishing, although highly controlled, changes in habitat and life history of the fish as well as predation put pressure on cod stocks. Yet, the high levels of early natural mortality appear to be the main factor in their decline. The data collected by Fisheries and Oceans Canada suggest the presence of several cohorts in the Saguenay River, where limited seasons of recreational fishing open periodically in this part of the park.

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Atlantic Wolffish

This fish is a predator that haunts the ocean depths. Although it is not fished commercially, a decline in the current population has been detected. Incidental catches of Atlantic Wolffish in the trawl nets used in deep-sea fishing are probably hampering its recovery.

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Blue whale

The Blue Whale is found in all the oceans of the world. This whale, the world’s largest living animal, is now listed as a species at risk due to pollution, collisions with boats and accidental entanglement in fishing gear. The North Atlantic population that uses the Marine Park counts as little as 250 to 300 individuals.

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Fin Whale

The fin Whale is the second largest animal in the world after the Blue Whale. It was heavily hunted in the 20th Century, and the population plummeted. Hunting was banned in 1972, but the fin Whale is still vulnerable to habitat disturbance, collisions and pollution, as are all whales.

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St. Lawrence Beluga

The snow-white beluga is the easiest to identify of all whales. Although hunting was banned in 1979, the population is failing to recover: there are only 889 individuals left. As belugas spend all year in the St. Lawrence, they are exposed to pollution and disturbance from recreational boating and marine transportation traffic.

THE ST. LAWRENCE BELUGA

Beluga whales are grayish white and the juvenile stage to adulthood. When mature, it measures between 3 and 5 meters. It resides in the year in the St. Lawrence Marine Park has several places where females give birth to their young and care for them.

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The beluga has a varied diet, feeding on fish and invertebrates. Pregnant and nursing females must address significant energy needs. The protection of their habitats and their favorite food is essential for the recovery of this population.

In earlier times, belugas were abundant in the waters of the St. Lawrence. There were between 7,800 and 10,000 at the end of the 19th century. Unfortunately, intensive commercial whaling in the early 20th century very nearly made them disappear. Despite the fact that whaling has been banned since 1979, the beluga population has not been restored. It is estimated that the population is actually in decline. Today, it would appear that only 889 belugas remain in the St. Lawrence.

“ The area of the Marine Park is probably the only place where the beluga whale and the blue whale meet.”

The need to protect the beluga and a large part of its summer habitat prompted the creation of the Saguenay–St. Lawrence Marine Park in 1998. It also led to the implementation of a number of protection, research and awareness-increasing activities. Many organizations, institutions and governments contribute to the efforts in this regard.

SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH

Protecting a given environment starts with understanding that environment. This is why scientific research is an essential tool to protect biodiversity. It allows to measure the effectiveness of protection measures and helps to mitigate the effects of human activities on the marine environment.

« They got out of the bay; twist and turn, “splashing”, spitting water!; they stay closely together as if hunting! »

Excerpts from the field notes of a beluga observer – summer 2015.

KEEPING AN EYE ON THE BELUGA

In collaboration with Parcs Québec, a Parks Canada team is studying the beluga whale in two specific areas of the Marine Park: at the mouth of the Saguenay River and in Baie Sainte-Marguerite, where pods of adult belugas and their calves spend a substantial part of the summer. The knowledge thus acquired and invaluable support of the local population will help us to better protect this magnificent marine mammal.

STUDYING THE LITTLE ONES TO UNDERSTAND THE GIANTS

On board “L’Alliance”, Parks Canada researchers navigate the Marine Park waters to find out what’s on the menu for whales, seals, and birds. Their equipment is specially designed to detect krill and fish below the surface. Understanding the available food of endangered species such as the beluga and the blue whale is invaluable to better protect their habitat. The first results of this study have contributed to the identification of the feeding grounds most used by baleen whales.

SCIENCE AND INDUSTRY:
COLLABORATING TO ESTABLISH EXEMPLARY PRACTICES.

With the information gathered by the research teams, the shipping industry has agreed to collaborate by reducing the speed of ships in the main feeding areas to reduce the risk of collisions with whales

At the initiative of Parks Canada and Fisheries and Oceans Canada, a working group designed specific measures for the protection of whales. The pilots of merchant and passenger vessels are asked to adapt their sailing in areas frequented by whales. They pay particular attention to the presence of animals, slow down in feeding areas and avoid sailing in the area most frequented by blue whales.

For more information on research projects on marine mammals of the St. Lawrence: http://baleinesendirect.org/en/scientific-exploration/research-projects/

THE MARINE ACTIVITIES IN THE SAGUENAY–ST.LAWRENCE MARINE PARK

REGULATIONS.

The Marine Activities in the Saguenay–St. Lawrence Marine Park Regulations govern activities that take place in the marine protected area, such as sea excursions, sea kayaking, pleasure boating and scuba diving. The Regulations prescribe, among other things, the behaviours, distances and speeds to be respected in the presence of marine mammals. The Regulations are one of the key means of establishing the Marine Park as one of the best places in the world to observe marine mammals while encouraging enchanting visitation experiences and protecting the marine environment. Please note that the text of the Regulations takes precedence over the information described on this page.

These Regulations are unique in Canada for the protection of marine mammals. They were developed in collaboration with governmental bodies, the public and stakeholders in the economic, social and environmental sectors. Amendments were made to the Regulations to ensure that they remain an effective conservation tool. They are in force since January 2017. For more information on changes to the Regulations, consult the Canada Gazette.

For more details on the Regulations, download the information brochure or visit the Legislation website: http://laws-lois.justice.gc.ca/eng/regulations/SOR-2002-76/

Please take note that if you are traveling with your boat within the boundaries of the Marine Park, you are responsible for knowing and respecting the Regulations.

See the following section for legal provisions that apply to some of the most common situations within the Marine Park:

IN THE PRESENCE OF BELUGAS OR BLUE WHALES

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No approach allowed

Maintain a distance of 400m at all times

If a whale surfaces suddenly to less than 400m: Reduce your speed and move away at least 400m

Prohibition to stop at less than ½ nautical mile of belugas: Keep a course and sail at a constant speed between 5 and 10 knots (if possible)

Avoid shifting or steering suddenly and repeatedly

WHEN TRAVELLING
THE MARINE PARK

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In the presence of whales, lower your speed, as if navigating in foggy conditions.

In the vicinity of an observation site, lower your speed to 10 knots in a ½ nautical mile radius of each boat

In the mouth of the Saguenay (see map), the maximum speed permitted is 15 knots

If a whale (except beluga and blue whale) appears near your boat, put the engine in neutral and wait for it to be at least 200m away or for it to dive before sailing again

WHEN WHALE-WATCHING

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An observation zone of ½ nautical mile is created around any boat engaged in whale watching

In the zone, the maximum speed is 10 knots in order to protect the whales

Observation time allowed: 60 minutes (then wait 60 min, before going back)

Maintain a 200m distance (400m from belugas and blue whales)

Approach speed (within 400 and 200m): minimum speed required to manoeuver

Prohibition of repeated stops, departures or changes of direction

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Maximum speed at any time in the Park (46 km/h)
*15 knots in the mouth of the Saguenay

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Minimum distance from threatened or endangered species

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Yield: whales have priority, do not cross their path. Do not place your boat in such a way that they come below the allowed distance

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The use of personal watercraft (jetskis), hovercraft and traction water sports are prohibited within the boundaries of the park

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Speed and distance conversion chart. Speed must be measured over the bottom

For advice and information specific to your activity, see the following sections:

NOTICE TO AIRCRAFT PILOTS (AIRPLANES, HELICOPTERS AND DRONES)

Flights within 2,000 feet above water are prohibited within the boundaries of the park. The use of drones for recreational purposes is prohibited above the boundaries of the Saguenay-St. Lawrence Marine Park, as in all national parks. The use of an aircraft for scientific research, education or promotion is licensed. Please refer to the permit for special activities in the Saguenay–St. Lawrence Marine Park for your application.

 

USE OF PERSONAL WATERCRAFT AND TRACTION WATER SPORTS

More than other means of marine transportation, sudden and frequent changes in speed of personal watercraft generate fluctuations in sounds that are particularly problematic for whales, especially beluga whales and their young, who need tranquility.

The use of these devices is generally focused on sports performance. Their movements are rapid and irregular, which is dangerous for whales, especially beluga whales and their calves. This type of craft is therefore considered incompatible with the experience of visiting a marine protected area.

A UNIQUE ENVIRONMENT

The Marine Park is home to an incredible diversity of life, including many endangered species for which this habitat is essential to their survival.

WE NEED TO UNDERSTAND

Scientific research allows to discover secrets of the underwater life, the dynamics specific to the Marine Park’s ecosystems and their inhabitants.

TO INCREASE ITS PROTECTION

Knowledge is the basis for development of programs for protection and recovery of species and ecosystems. It pushes the search for innovative solutions for the development of regulations and voluntary measures.